ACT Council of Social Service Inc.

Justice | Equity | Social Inclusion | Reconciliation

Nominations open: Canberra & District Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Community Sector Worker of the Year

25 May 2016

Since 2006, the ACT Council of Social Service has coordinated the Canberra & District NAIDOC Award for the Canberra & District Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Community Sector Worker of the Year. The award will be presented to the recipient at the ACT NAIDOC Ball on Saturday 2 July 2016.

Nominations for the award are open to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander workers in the ACT & region, who are employed in the community sector and non-government agencies who work with the local community.

Nominations should include information on how the worker is providing links between their organisations and their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities, and/or how they have supported Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities through their work. The award recognises the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workers at the forefront of this vital work.

Please provide as much information as possible to support the nomination.

Nominations close: Wednesday 15 June 2016

Contact: [email protected], ph: 02 6202 7200

Download: Nomination form - Canberra & District Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Community Sector Worker of the Year (doc)

 

2016 NAIDOC Week: 3-10 July

2016 NAIDOC Week celebrations are an opportunity for all Australians to come together to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait people. The 2016 NAIDOC Week theme ‘Songlines –The living narrative of our nation’ will highlight the importance of Songlines to the existence of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The National NAIDOC Committee encourages all Australians to explore and celebrate how, through Songlines, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people remain connected to Country and have been able to maintain and share sacred stories and ceremonies for tens of thousands of years.

For more information visit the NAIDOC website: www.naidoc.org.au